Year 4 Electricity Conductivity Teaching PowerPoint

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Year 4 Electricity Conductivity Teaching PowerPoint - science
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  • On the sixth slide you have a picture of a table to illustrate that a table leg can be a conductor, however the picture of the table has wooden legs which we know is a non-conductive material.  Any chance you could swap the picture in case we are pre-coffee when we check the slideshow? 

    , 3 days ago
    • Hi Laurella,
      Thank you so much for letting us know about this one. I'll get this updated right away!

      , 3 days ago
    • Hi there Laurella,
      Thank you for spotting this! Our lovely teacher and design teams have updated this resource and you can now download the new version. I hope you find it useful!

      , 2 days ago
Year 4 Electricity Conductivity Teaching PowerPoint

Year 4 Electricity Conductivity Teaching PowerPoint - This is the third powerpoint in a series of three for the Y4 Electricity Unit. There are comprehensive teachers notes covering all the electricity work in Key Stage 2 including the notes from this powerpoint. In this unit children will learn how to test for electrical conductivity. They will carry out investigative science to test for electrical conductivity and sort materials according to electrical conductivity. Remember to begin each lesson with a discussion about staying safe with electricity. You may want to start the unit with a lesson on staying safe with electricity, pointing out the difference between mains appliances and battery powered ones.
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  • Homepage » Scotland (CfE) » Second » Sciences » Forces, electricity and waves » Electricity
  • Homepage » Key Stage 2 » Science » Physical Processes » Electricity » Powerpoints
  • Homepage » 2014 National Curriculum Resources » Science » Lower Keystage 2 » Year 4 » Electricity » Recognise some common conductors and insulators, and associate metals with being good conductors
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    • Twinkl updated the Main Version 2 days ago