Common Core 4th Grade NF Standard Review Pack

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Common Core 4th Grade NF Standard Review Pack - usa, america, US Resources, Grade 4 NF, End of Grade Review
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This Review Pack is based on Common Core Standards for 4th Grade Number and Operations--Fractions. Print in portions for a quick assessment, or print the whole pack for a longer review. Can be used for homework, classwork, or as a quiz!
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  • Homepage » USA » Common Core » Math » Grade 4 » Number and Operations—Fractions » Understand decimal notation for fractions, and compare decimal fractions. » (4.NF.C.7) Compare two decimals to hundredths by reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two decimals refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual model.
  • Homepage » USA » Common Core » Math » Grade 4 » Number and Operations—Fractions » Understand decimal notation for fractions, and compare decimal fractions. » (4.NF.C.6) Use decimal notation for fractions with denominators 10 or 100. For example, rewrite 0.62 as 62/100; describe a length as 0.62 meters; locate 0.62 on a number line diagram.
  • Homepage » USA » Grade 3 - Grade 5 » Common Core Standards » Math
  • Homepage » USA » Common Core » Math » Grade 4 » Number and Operations—Fractions » Build fractions from unit fractions. » (4.NF.B.3) Understand a fraction a/b with a > 1 as a sum of fractions 1/b.
  • Homepage » USA » Common Core » Math » Grade 4 » Number and Operations—Fractions » Extend understanding of fraction equivalence and ordering. » (4.NF.A.1) Explain why a fraction a/b is equivalent to a fraction (n × a)/(n × b) by using visual fraction models, with attention to how the number and size of the parts differ even though the two fractions themselves are the same size. Use this principle to recognize and generate equivalent fractions.
  • Homepage » USA » Common Core » Math » Grade 4 » Number and Operations—Fractions » Build fractions from unit fractions. » (4.NF.B.4) Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction by a whole number.
  • Homepage » USA » Kindergarten - Grade 2 » Common Core Standards
  • Homepage » USA » Common Core » Math » Grade 4 » Number and Operations—Fractions » Build fractions from unit fractions. » (4.NF.B.4) Apply and extend previous understandings of multiplication to multiply a fraction by a whole number. » (4.NF.B.4.C) Solve word problems involving multiplication of a fraction by a whole number, e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem. For example, if each person at a party will eat 3/8 of a pound of roast beef, and there will be 5 people at the party, how many pounds of roast beef will be needed? Between what two whole numbers does your answer lie?
  • Homepage » USA » Common Core » Math » Grade 4 » Number and Operations—Fractions » Extend understanding of fraction equivalence and ordering. » (4.NF.A.2) Compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators, e.g., by creating common denominators or numerators, or by comparing to a benchmark fraction such as 1/2. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
  • Homepage » USA » Common Core » Math » Grade 4 » Number and Operations—Fractions » Understand decimal notation for fractions, and compare decimal fractions. » (4.NF.C.5) Express a fraction with denominator 10 as an equivalent fraction with denominator 100, and use this technique to add two fractions with respective denominators 10 and 100.2For example, express 3/10 as 30/100, and add 3/10 + 4/100 = 34/100.
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